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  #11  
Old February 13th, 2009, 08:39 PM
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Re: Cake Photos

Wow! you are so clever, do you just use a devil's food cake base, or do you have to go for a heavy fruit cake? MIL's one is just gorgeous, and I love the lion one.
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Old February 16th, 2009, 07:51 PM
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Re: Cake Photos

I wish I had your talent - 'though I don't know if I'd ever let anyone eat it after I'd made it
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Old February 21st, 2009, 08:04 AM
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Re: Cake Photos

Thanks Lynnie, Mrs X, snafu! It does take a lot of time, mainly because I'm self-taught so I don't know all of the shortcuts, let alone proper techniques. But I find it fun and rewarding to be able to give a unique gift for birthdays or other celebrations.

I learned some basic techniques in high school, even making a cake for a project in geography (got an A+. I've always enjoyed baking and would make baked gifts for friends and family, but once we had kids in the family to bake for, I started making decorated or themed cakes for their birthdays. During the past couple of years, it's turned into a hobby I really enjoy.

Mrs X - I make whatever cake the birthday person wishes for. I've just started working with fondant, so I haven't encounted problems yet, but I've heard that if the cake is not dense enough, the fondant will weigh it down. The banana cake was moist and dense enough to support it. Depending on what the person wants - sometimes the cake is made from scratch and other times it's a mix that gets doctored. The frostings and fillings are always from scratch.

snafu - I know what you mean, but for some reason it just doesn't bother me. I WANT people to eat it and enjoy it - maybe because I also work hard to make sure the recipe is good? I'd rather have pictures than a moldy cake Now if I made a painting for someone and they cut it up and made a mosaic out of it, I'd probably have a hard time with that!
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Old February 21st, 2009, 09:16 AM
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Re: Cake Photos

Those cakes are really amazing!! I can't believe you can do that and are self-taught! You must have the patience of a saint.
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Old February 21st, 2009, 09:28 AM
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Re: Cake Photos

Those are wonderful!!!!! I can't even bake a cake, letalone make them that amazing.
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Old February 27th, 2009, 02:51 PM
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Re: Cake Photos

How in the world do you roll fondant - I just had my first experience with it (your picts gave me the idea) I should have asked BEFORE trying (does that make me an honorary teen? )


I've made a ship cake before (a couple of times) & thought how hard can rolling icing be?

(edit) I was just trying something very simple - turns out its not as "simple" as I thought. BTW- do you add flavoring & if so what kind (DS wasn't too impressed with the taste - I used store bought/premade stuff)

Last edited by snafu; February 27th, 2009 at 07:49 PM.
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Old February 28th, 2009, 07:54 AM
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Re: Cake Photos

Quote:
Originally Posted by snafu View Post
How in the world do you roll fondant - I just had my first experience with it (your picts gave me the idea) I should have asked BEFORE trying (does that make me an honorary teen? )


I've made a ship cake before (a couple of times) & thought how hard can rolling icing be?

(edit) I was just trying something very simple - turns out its not as "simple" as I thought. BTW- do you add flavoring & if so what kind (DS wasn't too impressed with the taste - I used store bought/premade stuff)
Snafu - Don't get discouraged or overwhelmed! It takes some practice (I'm still learning), but was you are able to figure out how to do more with it, it gets a lot more fun to work with.

I've never used the store bought stuff because I heard how bad it tastes. When I was the office manager in a bakery, we told our wedding customers if they chose a cake with it, they probably would be peeling it off because they wouldn't like the taste.

I make my fondant - it's pretty easy and very inexpensive! I found the recipe on line, and while there are a few variations, I use the basic. Later I'll experiment with some of the others.

When rolling it, lightly grease your rolling pin and mat (or clean, smooth counter) with solid Crisco. I hadn't had Crisco in our home in many many years--with making fondant and buttercream, we're now on our second large tub - yuck!

TOOLS :

Rolling Pin
If you don't have a fondant rolling pin, you can get one at Hobby Lobby or Michaels. The large one is $20 (but you have to buy the guides seperately)- I used their 40% off coupons they often have to buy most of my tools. The small one (which includes the guides and is ideal for rolling small pieces of fondant for decoration) can also be found at most Wal-Marts (in the baking section of the craft area - not the grocery baking isle).

Rolling Mat
I purchased a Wilton Fondant mat at Hobby Lobby. I realized after we opened it, it's a lot like a pie rolling mat - it has measured circle guides to help you roll to the right size and shape without having to constantly stop and measure. It's pretty flimsy in that it can crease easy (creases will leave an impression on your fondant). I bought one yard of heavy clear vinyl and cut it into different sizes. A fairly large size for the making of the fondant, one slight larger than the Wilton mat to put over the mat when rolling, and a few smaller sizes for rolling and to work with smaller pieces of fondant for decorations.

Fondant smoother
pretty inexpensive and can be found at Wal-Mart, Hobby Lobby or Michaels. Without using a coupon, it's cheaper at Wal-Mart. I bought two (for use on larger cakes).

Pastry wheel
You can use a pizza cutter, but I like the small size of the pastry wheel - it gives me better control when cutting and can get into smaller spaces. I just use a regular metal blade pastry wheel.

Decorating with Fondant
You can use tools around the house (like cookie cutters) to get different shapes and impressions or get tools at Wal-Mart, Hobby Lobby, and Michaels. I mix in a little Gumtex when using it for decorating-it helps it to dry quicker and hold it's shape better.
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Old February 28th, 2009, 08:01 AM
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Re: Cake Photos

The Marshmallow Fondant tastes good. It's personally not my favorite icing (it's pretty sweet), but I won't peel it off or spit it out. Other people love it. But for fondant, from what I've found, it has been determined to be the best.

I'll post the recipe from the Wilton forum (this is not a Wilton recipe - just many decorations prefer using this fondant). Like I said, I found several variations of it online, but I like the way this poster also gave the recipe for a smaller batch, chocolate fondant, and addressed basic issues. Another site answers pretty much all questions, but it takes hours to go through everything.



http://www.wilton.com/forums/message...hreadid=116196

MARSHMALLOW FONDANT REVISITED
This MMF is placed on an already iced buttercream cake that is made as smooth as possible. A nice smooth surface is needed for a more professional appearance of the fondant. Any imperfections below the MMF will show through.

RECIPE FOR SMALL BATCH:
Marshmallow fondant
1 cup mini marshmallows
1 tbsp water
1 1/2- 1 3/4 cup powder sugar

Place marshmallows in a standard 1 cup measuring cup and push down and pack them in. Place in a microwave safe bowl and add the water. Put in the microwave for about 20 seconds. Just long enough for them to soften and puff up. Take out and stir with a spoon until it is combined well. At this point it looks kind of soupy. Then add the sugar and mix and fold until all is incorporated and it is no longer sticky. I take it out of the bowl when it gets to the point where most of the sugar is incorporated and I knead it in my hands. This takes roughly about 5-7 minutes. Take a fondant roller or a regular rolling pin and roll out just as you would Wilton's fondant. You can get this fondant almost paper thin and it also repairs well. It's cheap, easy to work with, and tastes great too. ***Microwaves times vary so please adjust to your own microwave.

RECIPE FOR LARGE BATCH:
1- 16 oz bag of mini marshmallows
2 tbsp water
2 lbs powdered sugar (8 cups)

Do the same procedure as above for the small batch.

CHOCOLATE or WHITE CHOCOLATE MMF RECIPE:
For Chocolate Marshmallow Fondant:
Add 1 oz melted chocolate.
1 tbsp cocoa powder to the basic recipe.

I add good quality chocolate to my marshmallow fondant. I prefer Lindt or Ghirardelli. It just makes it taste better. I want everything to be palate pleasing. You can add candy melts if you so choose. There is nothing wrong with that at all. Just depends on your taste buds.

Well I have experimented with the cocoa powder separately.........and also melted chocolate separately. If I was going to make a choice to do one or the other separately I would choose the melted version. I just prefer the texture that I get from it. It incorporates better. I sifted my cocoa FIRST too to rid it of any lumps. They both did have nice flavor. Then.......on the flipside........I put the cocoa powder AND the melted chocolate TOGETHER and I really liked the pungent chocolate flavor that I achieved. The mixture of the dry cocoa and the liquefied chocolate kind of balances out the moisture, so to speak, so that you don't have to add a ton of powdered sugar to make up for the added moisture. If you want to stick with just the cocoa powder and get a really strong chocolate flavor just swap out some of the powdered sugar for the cocoa powder. You can also add Lorann Oils chocolate flavoring to this as well.

For White chocolate Marshmallow fondant:
Add 1-2oz good quality white chocolate, melted to the basic recipe above.
I use this if I want a white chocolate flavor and a "white" color.

I would add up to 2 ozs of white chocolate to achieve a nice, rich white chocolate flavor. I add a little, mix and knead, and then taste allot to see if I need to add more or not.
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Old February 28th, 2009, 08:01 AM
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Re: Cake Photos

Cont'd

STICKINESS PROBLEMS?
If it is way to sticky to work with then cut back on the amount of liquid that you used by about 1/2 tsp. This will help.
Let it sit out and "air dry" for about 10 minutes.
Use a small amount of Crisco on your work surface, rolling pin, bowl,and hands. A little goes a very long way so don't go over board with the Crisco.

HOW TO ROLL IT OUT?
Well........when I make a cake and cover it totally in the marshmallow fondant I typically roll it about 1/8" to ¼” thick. That way the flavors of the buttercream and the marshmallow fondant "marries well". If I roll it too thick......people in my neck of the woods don't like to "chew" their frosting. This way I get the best of both worlds! Rule of thumb here though: it has to be rolled thick enough so that it won't tear. I use the rubber rings for the ends of my rolling pin. That way I get an even thickness all over. A really CHEAP way to roll this out is go to Wal-Mart and back in the fabrics section they have these really long pieces of clear vinyl. I think I bought a yard of it for like $3.00 or around there. Spray or dust this mat and roll your MMF out on it. You can use the mat to transfer it to your cake as well. It is really easy to do.

HOW MUCH WILL THIS COVER?
I can get my small batch to cover a single layer 10" round. The thicker you roll your fondant the less surface area coverage you will achieve. You must take that into consideration.


HOW TO STORE IT?
Dough that is not in use must stay covered with plastic wrap or it will dry out. Or place it in a Ziploc bag.

It is best if it can be kept in an AC room in the summer time. DO NOT place it in direct sunlight or next to a heat register in the wintertime. It will not hold up in those conditions. If kept at about 75 degrees it will last for about 4 days. I haven't went any longer than that. The cake was gone by then.
EXPIRATION?
There is nothing in it that will spoil so to speak. What I look for is the latest expiration dated marshmallows I can find. I generally stick with that date.

Fondant stands up better to heat and humidity than buttercream does. Eating it right away is the best bet in any high heat/humidity situations in my book. You will notice some "stickiness" appearance to it if it sits out for too long in the high temps/humidity. Keep it out of direct sunlight or any kind of direct heat!!!!!!!

HOW TO FLAVOR IT?
I add any flavor Lorann Oil flavorings to this. Something that will compliment my cake well. What I do is cut back on the water and add about 1/8 tsp Lorann flavoring. You can certainly add more (especially if I make the large batch) for a more of a pungent flavor, just adjust the water amount accordingly. *****The more liquid you add to this will make it stickier to work with. Try to be accurate in measuring the liquid.***** Lorann Oil flavorings are concentrated flavors so you only need a drop or two. I add a little, knead, taste, and add some more if need be. Most baking shops or craft shops have these. You can also purchase them thru them directly at www.lorannoils.com or www.ckproducts.com.

HOW TO COLOR IT?
Well I have experimented with this several different ways. If I want to make the whole batch of Marshmallow fondant one color then I have added the color, just Wilton paste color, Americolors, or Chefmaster colors.....any will work for this, when I pull the bowl out of the microwave when it looks "soupy". Stirred it up and then added the powdered sugar. Otherwise I have added it after it has come together and kneaded it in by hand. I use plastic gloves too when I do this, because otherwise your hands are never the same!!!!






HOW TO MAKE DECORATIONS WITH IT?
When I make decorations I mold or shape them in the figure I desire and then let them sit out on a piece of wax paper on my counter top till completely dry. Drying time depends on the humidity conditions of your kitchen. The more humid your kitchen is the longer drying time. Then if I don't need them for a few days I'll place them in a container and not completely lock on the lid. If it gets airtight......I have had a couple decorations soften up again. Then you need to let them air dry once again. They will last for a long time. I have used some that were 4-5 weeks old and they were just fine. I am talking about roses and such when I speak of the 4-5 week time frame, just need to clarify that. I have pearls that I made months ago and they are just fine.
I have always had good luck with just water on a paint brush to attach decorations to MMF. The only time I used piping gel was when I was working with heavy drapes. Things like larger decorations (like big balls, teddy bears, etc) I stick a tooth pick or a very small diameter dowel rod in them and then into the cake for more support. If it is a buttercream iced cake........then I attach the fondant decos with buttercream. If it is a fondant covered cake........then I attach the fondant decos with water if they are small decos. If they are large, heavy decos then I will attach them with royal or even buttercream icing with the tooth pick/dowel.

Yes you can make flowers out of MMF. Ribbon roses are fast and easy with this. However if you want to make cut out flower petals say for like regular roses then you need to add some Tylose powder to it to make it stiffer and dry faster.

CAN YOU RESTORE IT BACK TO LIFE?
Dried out Marshmallow fondant can be restored back to life. Just place it back into the microwave and nuke it for a few seconds to revive it back to its original state. The bigger the batch the more time on the microwave. Example: small batch 3-5 seconds.......large batch about 10 seconds. Microwaves vary too so keep that in mind. Re-knead it and your good to go!

DOES IT DRY OUT AFTER IT IS APPLIED TO A CAKE AND BECOME HARD? CRACKING?
To prevent the cracking issue just rub it with a tiny bit of Crisco on a paper towel if it is already rolled out onto your cake. If it is still in a dough stage, I usually put some Crisco on my hands, just enough to give it a gloss look to it, and then knead the dough a little and that helps if it wants to crack on me. You can add a couple of drops of water too to replenish it back. MMF will get a hard appearance on the outside, but the inside remains soft and pliable.




USES? WHAT CAN I DO WITH IT?
As far as airbrushing on the marshmallow fondant this does work really well. The spray cans also gave a nice effect on this fondant. (Just in case some people don't have an airbrush.)

I have also used luster dusts and painted with paste color mixed with lemon extract or vodka. All worked very well for me.

Ribbon rollers, fondant cutters, cookie cutters, embossers, etc ……all work very well with this. MMF works just the same as any other commercial fondant as far as the uses for it.

MOLDING?
It does work. I had to play around with it one day to get it to work. I tried several methods too.
1. I tried to roll it in cornstarch and pressed it into the mold. That worked pretty well. I tried the same thing only this time with with powdered sugar. That worked ok too.

2. Then I tried taking a small paint brush, spraying it over a piece of wax paper, and lightly brushing the mold. This gave it a really shiny appearance. Now if a shiny appearance is what you are trying to get then by all means do so. Seashells works wonderfully for this.

3. I was thinking on the same lines as how I make my cream cheese mints.......I rolled it in sugar first and then pressed it into the mold. This worked too, but left the granules on the MMF. I let them sit to dry and I could dust off some of the granules. It gave it a rough look. It is hot and humid here so I let mine sit for about 2-3 days to dry.

KITCHEN DOUGH HOOK?
By all means you can certainly use your dough hook to save some elbow grease. It works very well.

FREEZING? REFRIGERATING?
Typically any cake that is buttercream or fondant covered, unfilled should be left out and edible for up to 4 days. If it has a perishable filling then it needs to be refrigerated. My only other time I will chill it is when the cake is going to an outside venue where it is very humid and hot. It helps it last a little longer.




SMALL VS. LARGE MARSHMALLOWS?
Several decorators here have confirmed that they have used either or and they have had great results. I personally just use the mini marshmallows.

POSTED BY TOMORROW:
“I always use the large marshmallows and have never had to add more water. So I don't think it's the size of the marshmallows that matter. 100 small is the same amount of marshmallow as the 10 large. Only difference is that you may have to heat them for a few seconds more. Which basically means they are being heated longer and lose more moisture, but those couple of seconds don't really make that much of a difference. At the very least if it's way over heated, you'd be using like a tsp less icing sugar. I don't melt mine completely... when there are still little bumps of marshmallow, I just stir and the heat of the melted ones melt the chunks.”
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Old March 25th, 2009, 09:20 PM
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Re: Cake Photos

Snafu (and all others who are interested, of course ),

This is a different fondant recipe. I have not tried it yet, but according to an informal poll on another site, it's a bit hit. A lot of the people who previous made and used MMF (marshmallow fondant) now only use MFF (Michele Foster's Fondant). I like how it can be made ahead and frozen. You can't do that with MMF. We through out some between cakes because you should only keep it a few weeks. Though it's inexpensive to make, I still hated throwing it out!


http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_reci...d-Fondant.html

Michele Foster's Updated Fondant

Serves/Yields: 3 1/2 lbs.
Prep. Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Category: Frostings, Fondant/Gumpaste/Sugarpaste
Difficulty: Moderate


Since the original post of this recipe has brought up so many comments and questions I decided to post an updated recipe with alternate versions and additional information. Thank you for all of the wonderful comments. Michele

1/2 cup cream
3 Tbsp. unflavored gelatin
1 cup corn syrup
3 Tbsp. butter
3 Tbsp. glycerin
2 tsp. clear vanilla
dash salt
Approximately 3 1/2 lbs. powdered sugar

1. Place milk in 2 cup measuring cup, add gelatin, stir to combine.
2. Let gelatin "bloom" or become firm, usually less than 5 minutes.
3. Place mixture in microwave and heat for 1 minute on high. Stir. If gelatin does not become liquid, microwave in 15 second intervals until the gelatin is melted. Stir between heating cycles.
4. Put corn syrup, butter, glycerin, vanilla, and salt in large measuring cup, add this mixture to the melted gelatin. Stir.
5. Microwave mixture for 2 minutes on high setting. Butter should be almost melted. Stir, set aside to cool to LUKE WARM.
6. Add 2 lbs. of powdered sugar to large mixing bowl. A Kitchen Aid mixer works best for this. Do not use a hand mixer.
7. Strain LUKE WARM mixture into the powdered sugar; mix by hand until just blended. Straining removes any lumps that did not dissolve during the cooking process.
8. Place the bowl on the mixer, add several cups of powdered sugar, and mix very slowly with the dough hook.
9. Continue to add powdered sugar, about a cup at a time, until fondant forms a soft ball. It should not slide down the dough hook and there may be some powdered sugar left in the bottom of the bowl. This is normal. Keeping the mixer covered with a damp dish towel will prevent powdered sugar from coating the kitchen.
10. While the mixer is running prepare a surface for kneading. You will need some powdered sugar and a non-stick surface. Also have plastic wrap prepared with a think coat of cooking oil. Do not use spray, this can cause the fondant to crust.
11. When fondant is ready, remove from the bowl and knead in a small amount of powdered sugar until the fondant is smooth. It will still be slightly soft.
12. Wrap in oil coated plastic wrap; wrap again, and then place in an air tight container such as a zipper bag or plastic tub.
13. Allow fondant to rest at least 6 hours or over night.
14. Knead only the amount required until smooth before rolling out to cover cake or board.

VARIATIONS AND OTHER INFORMATION:
CHOCOLATE - add 6 ounces of semi-sweet chocolate chips to the corn syrup. Follow the recipe as normal. Add brown food coloring to make it darker.
WHITE CHOCOLATE- add 6 ounces of white chocolate chips to the corn syrup. Follow the recipe as normal.
DAIRY-FREE FONDANT - Replace equal amounts of water, non-dairy creamer, fruit juice, or other liquid for the cream. Replace the butter with equal amounts of shortening. This also works for unflavored fondant when only covering cake dummies.

GENERAL INFORMATION
*If the fondant is too soft or stretchy, knead in additional powdered sugar in small amounts until fondant is of the consistency of play dough.

*If the fondant is too stiff knead in small amounts of glycerin until softened. This is easier by working in small batches and then blending the batches together. Keep any unused fondant covered.

*Fondant can be stored at room temperature for at least a month. For longer periods, place well wrapped fondant in the freezer. Allow fondant to warm slowly to room temperature before using, usually over night. DO NOT THAW IN THE MICROWAVE.

*The sugar and cooking process preserves the dairy ingredients, so there is no worry of spoilage.

*Chocolate can be a little stiff, more glycerin might be needed. If you add brown food coloring remember that it has glycerin in it (gel colors) and will soften the fondant.

*Please remember that many things can affect the consistency of the fondant. This includes temperature, humidity, temperature of the mixture when added to the powdered sugar, any flavorings that are added, and even the temperature of your own hands. THE FIRST 5 INGREDIENTS MUST BE MEASURED ACCURATELY.

*Color can be added during the cooking stage or the mixing stage. Adding color after the fondant has rested is much more difficult, but it can still be done.

*This recipe is naturally off-white. Add white food color for whiter fondant. Gel color will change the consistency.
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